Man Made Laws Vs Shariah, Ruling by Laws other than what Allah Revealed, Conditions and Ruling

This book appears at a time when many other books and ideas are being propogated to justify the status quo of the ummah, and the position of those who are not ruling by what Allah has revealed and to detract from the seriousness of the situation.

This book is a detailed discussion of the extreme views of both the Murji’ah and Khawaarij, which are clouding the ummah’s vision as they have done for far too long. The view of the Murji’ah states that faith is simply the matter of belief in the heart, which no link to action, whilst the view of the Khawaarij is that any sin equals a mjor kuft act which puts a person beyond the pale of Islam. The author highlights these distorted views, then explains the middle way of Ahl as-Sunnah wa’l-Jamaa’ah, based on the Qur’an and Sunnah, where faith is composed of both belief and action, and it may increase and decrease; while sin does not necessarily equal a major kuft act, but there are some major sins which do consitute major kufr acts and put a person beyond the pale of Islam, such as ruling by something other than what Allah has revealed.

Once this idea is clear in the minds of ordinary Muslims, the Muslim ummah will not accept anything from their governments and rulers except shari’ah, to rule their lives, and they will realize that any other system or law is nothing more or less than kufr in disbelief and a deviation from Islam.

My Heart Became Attached: The Strange Journey of John Walker Lindh

 

What would cause an otherwise intelligent, well-educated, and, by all accounts, privileged Californian to forgo an easy life in the United States to struggle for survival in a land of strife and mortal danger? With this question in mind, journalist Mark Kukis retraces the personal and spiritual evolution of the most reviled American traitor since Lee Harvey Oswald. “My Heart Became Attached” provides a detailed biographical account of John Walker Lindh’s journey, beginning with his childhood in an affluent San Francisco suburb. Kukis then follows Lindh’s footsteps to Yemen, where he learned Arabic and radical Islam, and on through the wild hinterlands of Pakistan and Afghanistan. The journey culminates with the violent prison uprising at Mazar-i-Sharif.

While conducting research, Kukis achieved unparalleled access to major players in Lindh’s life. In Pakistan, Kukis found the militants from the jihad group that trained with Lindh in a Pakistani camp. Kukis also conducted several rounds of interviews with Lindh’s friend who initially settled him in an Islamic boarding school, with Lindh’s instructor there, and with fellow pupils in the hardscrabble Pakistani village where he studied the Koran before journeying into Afghanistan. In Afghanistan, Kukis interviewed Taliban soldiers who fought at Mazar-i-Sharif and General Dostum, warlord of the region. Ex-roommates, family members, and friends all contributed to Kukis’s research, resulting in the most thorough portrait available of the American Taliban.

 

Purification of the soul

 

For a number of reasons, this is a very important time to be writing a book of this nature. First, the concept of purification of the soul as a whole is and always will be central to the message of Islam and to the welfare of humans, both in this life and the Hereafter. Indeed, it was a main mission of the messengers and prophets themselves.

Second, there is a very strong need to shed light on the correct path of purification as delineated by the Quran and Sunnah- free of the foreign influence, deviations and heresies that have found their way into the realm of the religion and have caused a great deal of harm. The path described by the Quran and Sunnah is the only path that can result in a true purification of the soul. Indeed, it is the only path that is truly consistent with the purpose for which humans were created. Hence, any discussion of purification of the soul must rely heavily and exclusively on the Quran and Sunnah and what can be correctly derived from those two sources.

Third, many Muslims themselves are today being influenced by secular, materialistic psychology, leading them to neglect the spiritual side of humans and to ignore the guidance that Islam offers for the purification of the soul. This influence often occurs at a level wherein the person himself may not be completely aware that it is occurring.

Fourth, for some time now, there has been an Islamic revival spreading throughout the Muslim world. Upon closer inspection, it seems that this revival is somewhat tenuous and delicate, in the sense that for many Muslims it is more of an µemotional¦ phenomenon. In order for this revival to be truly successful and lead to what it needs to lead to, it must be guided by the comprehensive teachings of Islam. First and foremost among those teachings is what is related to the purification of the soul. Without the purification of the souls, the revival will only be on the outer shell and will, in fact, be a “deceptive” revival, in the sense that the inner consciousness will not have been reformed and the lapse back to the pre-revival times may be very close at hand. Indeed, without the purifications of the souls, the very goals of the revival from the outset may be wrong.

 

Gore Vidal – American Empire

28 hours in the dark heart of Egypt’s torture machine

Rough justice: Egyptian plainclothes police officers arresting a demonstrator in Cairo. Hundreds of opponents of President Hosni Mubarak have been detained, protesters say. Photograph: Marco Longari/AFP/Getty Images

The sickening, rapid click-click-clicking of the electric shock device sounded like an angry rattlesnake as it passed within inches of my face. Then came a scream of agony, followed by a pitiful whimpering from the handcuffed, blindfolded victim as the force of the shock propelled him across the floor.

A hail of vicious punches and kicks rained down on the prone bodies next to me, creating loud thumps. The torturers screamed abuse all around me. Only later were their chilling words translated to me by an Arabic-speaking colleague: “In this hotel, there are only two items on the menu for those who don’t behave – electrocution and rape.”

Cuffed and blindfolded, like my fellow detainees, I lay transfixed. My palms sweated and my heart raced. I felt myself shaking. Would it be my turn next? Or would my outsider status, conferred by holding a British passport, save me? I suspected – hoped – that it would be the latter and, thankfully, it was. But I could never be sure.

I had “disappeared”, along with countless Egyptians, inside the bowels of the Mukhabarat, President Hosni Mubarak’s vast security-intelligence apparatus and an organisation headed, until recently, by his vice-president and former intelligence chief, Omar Suleiman, the man trusted to negotiate an “orderly transition” to democratic rule.

Judging by what I witnessed, that seems a forlorn hope.

I had often wondered, reading accounts of political prisoners detained and tortured in places such as junta-run Argentina of the 1970s, what it would be like to be totally at the mercy of, and dependent on, your jailer for everything – food, water, the toilet. I never dreamed I would find out. Yet here I was, cooped up in a tiny room with a group of Egyptian detainees who were being mercilessly brutalised.

I had been handed over to the security services after being stopped at a police checkpoint near central Cairo last Friday. I had flown there, along with an Iraqi-born British colleague, Abdelilah Nuaimi, to cover Egypt’s unfolding crisis for RFE/RL, an American radio station based in Prague.

We knew beforehand that foreign journalists had been targeted by security services as they scrambled to contain a revolt against Mubarak’s regime, so our incarceration was not unique.

Yet it was different. My experience, while highly personal, wasn’t really about me or the foreign media. It was about gaining an insight – if that is possible behind a blindfold – into the inner workings of the Mubarak regime. It told me all I needed to know about why it had become hated, feared and loathed by the mass of ordinary Egyptians.

We had been stopped en route to Tahrir Square, scene of the ongoing mass demonstrations, little more than half an hour after leaving Cairo airport.

Uniformed and plainclothes police swarmed around our car and demanded our passports and to see inside my bag. A satellite phone was found and one of the men got in our car and ordered our driver to follow a vehicle in front, which led us to a nearby police station.

There, an officer subjected our fixer, Ahmed, to intense questioning: did he know any Palestinians? Were they members of Hamas? Then we were ordered to move again, and eventually drove to a vast, unmarked complex next to a telecommunications building.

That’s when Ahmed sensed real danger. “I hope I don’t get beaten up,” he said. He had good reason to worry.

We were ordered out and blindfolded before being herded into another vehicle and driven a few hundred yards. Then we were pushed into what seemed like an open-air courtyard and handcuffed. I heard the rapid-fire clicking of the electric rattlesnake – I knew instantly what it was – and then Ahmed screaming in pain. A cold sweat washed over me and I thought I might faint or vomit. “I’m going to be tortured,” I thought.

But I wasn’t. “Mr Robert, what is wrong,” I was asked, before being told, with incongruous kindness, to sit down. I sensed then that I would avoid the worst. But I didn’t expect to gain such intimate knowledge of what that meant.

After being interrogated and held in one room for hours, I was frogmarched after nightfall to another room, upstairs, along with other prisoners. We believe our captors were members of the internal security service.

That’s when the violence – and the terror – really began.

At first, I attached no meaning to the dull slapping sounds. But comprehension dawned as, amid loud shouting, I heard the electric shock rods being ratcheted up. My colleague, Abdelilah – kept in a neighbouring room – later told me what the torturers said next.

“Get the electric shocks ready. This lot are to be made to really suffer,” a guard said as a new batch of prisoners were brought in.

“Why did you do this to your country?” a jailer screamed as he tormented his victim. “You are not to speak in here, do you understand?” one prisoner was told. He did not reply. Thump. “Do you understand?” Still no answer. More thumps. “Do you understand?” Prisoner: “Yes, I understand.” Torturer: “I told you not to speak in here,” followed by a cascade of thumps, kicks, and electric shocks.

Exhausted, the prisoners fell asleep and snored loudly, provoking another round of furious assaults. “You’re committing a sin,” a stricken detainee said in a weak, pitiful voice.

Craving to see my fellow inmates, I discreetly adjusted my blindfold. I briefly saw three young men – two of them looked like Islamists, with bushy beards – with their hands cuffed behind their backs (mine were cuffed to the front), before my captors spotted what I had done and tightened my blindfold.

The brutality continued until, suddenly, I was ordered to stand and pushed towards a room, where I was told I was being taken to the airport. I received my possessions and looked at my watch. It was 5pm. I had been in captivity for 28 hours.

The ordeal was almost over – save for another 16 hours waiting at an airport deportation facility. It had been nightmarish but it was nothing to what my Egyptian fellow-captives had endured.

Later, I learned that Ahmed, the fixer, had been released at the same time as Abdelilah and me. He told friends we had been “treated very well” but that he had bruises “from sleeping on the floor”. I had flown to Cairo to find out what was ailing so many Egyptians. I did not expect to learn the answer so graphically.

Robert Tait is a senior correspondent with RFE/RL. He was formerly the Guardian’s correspondent in Tehran and Istanbul

• This article was amended on 10 February 2011 to remove references to electrocution (killing by electric shock). These have been corrected to ‘electric shock’.

 

http://www.readersupportednews.org/off-site-news-section/132-132/4904-28-hours-in-the-dark-heart-of-egypts-torture-machine

دعاء الشيخ جبريل – ميدان التحرير Sheikh Jebril Dua – Tahrir Square